Mansions in the Sky

By Simon Armitage

£3.95

Mansions in the Sky: The Rise and Fall of Branwell Brontë

An exhibition of objects and poems by Simon Armitage.
 
In 2017, to mark the bicentenary of the birth of Branwell Brontë, the Brontë Parsonage Museum invited Simon Armitage to explore Branwell’s colourful history through drawings and possessions from the Museum’s collection.  These were displayed alongside a letter and poem that an ambitious and optimistic nineteen year-old Branwell had written to William Wordsworth in 1837, in which he referred to building ‘mansions in the sky’.

In addition to curating the exhibition, Armitage wrote ten new poems in response to Branwell’s belongings and they appear in this catalogue, alongside photographs of the objects which inspired them.

Armitage said, “Most people know Branwell either as the ne're-do-well brother of the Brontë family or as the shadowy absence in his famous portrait of his three sisters. We'll never really know Branwell properly, all his light and shade, but in putting together events for his bicentenary I feel as if I've been privy to some of his hopes and dreams, especially the ambitions he had for himself as a Romantic poet among the Yorkshire moors.”

£3.95

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Mansions in the Sky: The Rise and Fall of Branwell Brontë

An exhibition of objects and poems by Simon Armitage.
 
In 2017, to mark the bicentenary of the birth of Branwell Brontë, the Brontë Parsonage Museum invited Simon Armitage to explore Branwell’s colourful history through drawings and possessions from the Museum’s collection.  These were displayed alongside a letter and poem that an ambitious and optimistic nineteen year-old Branwell had written to William Wordsworth in 1837, in which he referred to building ‘mansions in the sky’.

In addition to curating the exhibition, Armitage wrote ten new poems in response to Branwell’s belongings and they appear in this catalogue, alongside photographs of the objects which inspired them.

Armitage said, “Most people know Branwell either as the ne're-do-well brother of the Brontë family or as the shadowy absence in his famous portrait of his three sisters. We'll never really know Branwell properly, all his light and shade, but in putting together events for his bicentenary I feel as if I've been privy to some of his hopes and dreams, especially the ambitions he had for himself as a Romantic poet among the Yorkshire moors.”